passages

this artwork, which I’ve called rites of passage: forget me not, honours the memory of 2 convict women, represented by the 2 soft sculpture dolls

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their names were amelia laing and sophia gunyon

they endured harsh conditions in the cascades female factory in hobart during the mid to late 1800’s, along with many other female convicts transported from the united kingdom

four mattresses are filled with shredded documents, to represent the secrecy surrounding their lives, until i researched them

they endured much heartache, but their descendants live on, including my husband and children, who are connected by blood

[digital printing on cloth, new and upcycled fabrics, found buttons, shredded paper print-outs, hand stitching]

not for sale

7 thoughts on “passages

  1. Beautiful tribute to these women, they have not been forgotten indeed, thanks to you. I love the thoughts you put in every stitch thinking of them and their destiny.
    A beautiful work created with the heart.

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    • What a lovely comment you’ve left for me to find this morning! Thank you so much … these 2 women are part of my husband’s and children’s heritage, and it was quite an emotional experience to make this. Glad it shows! =D

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  3. This makes me want for more of the history of these women. I understand how emotional this journey has been for you with the close connection. You are a brave soul to have allowed yourself this expression through your art and a book. I applaud you! Betina

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    • Hi Betina! I’ve only just found your lovely comment; very sorry it’s taken me so long! This artwork has toured all around our state, and is finally back in my gallery. The book, to which I am a contributor for research purposes, is due out in May. I’ll post about it on my blog when I have my copy! =D

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    • Thank you … it was very a emotional process, more than I realized until afterwards. The stories I’ve written will be used in a book which is being published by a researcher in Hobart; I’ll post about it when it comes out! =D

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